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1

patch 8.2.1978 provide special key <cmd> to avoid mode changes.


-1

use this: :split | terminal :vsplit | terminal Or you can use the shorter :vs | te or :vs +te. and you can assign maps for that like: nmap <C-S-P> :split | terminal <CR> this rocks! author: https://github.com/neovim/neovim/issues/5073#issuecomment-233172421


2

Section :help terminal-api includes a thorough description of the API and also an example function: function Tapi_Impression(bufnum, arglist) if len(a:arglist) == 2 echomsg "impression " . a:arglist[0] echomsg "count " . a:arglist[1] endif endfunc Then inside a :term you can call this function by sending a special sequence ...


2

:hide enew is what the OP asked for. This will hide - not destroy - whatever is in the current buffer of the current window and open a new NO-FILE in-memory-only buffer.


1

Sadly, no, it is not possible. If you look at :help windows-intro, the following (among other) is said: A buffer is the in-memory text of a file. A window is a viewport on a buffer. ...


1

I know this is a few years late, but you can use nmap <Down> <C-e> nmap <Up> <C-y> This worked for me.


3

Is there a reason you open each file in a different tab with -p? The standard way to open multiple files is to open them in different buffers. See this answer for more about buffers vs windows vs tabs. You can cycle through the buffer displayed in the top window with :bnext and similar. The workflow I would suggest to achieve what you want would be ...


1

You could open the terminal in a new tab page (:tab terminal) and then use :tabnext / :tabprevious to switch between them.


1

Option 1 (not in Gvim): Use CTRL-Z to suspend Vim. That will give you Vim's parent shell. To go back to Vim, enter fg in the command line. Option 2: Spawn a terminal in a Vim window with :ter (or :terminal). Now, go back to the original window with CTRL-W CTRL-W and press CTRL-W _ to maximize its height. Note that the terminal window will still occupy one ...


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