17

The Syntastic documentation (:help syntastic-pymode) explains what to do: [...] To avoid both plugins opening error windows, you can either set passive mode for python in syntastic (see syntastic_mode_map), or disable lint checks in "python-mode", [...] So you should be able to disable automatic syntax checking for Python files with something like ...


11

As mentioned in the comments be aware of the consequences this modification has to you work environment (know exactly which eslint rules you use to "fix" things). To answer your question: adding the option to the eslint execution with syntactic is straight forward. Simply add this to your .vimrc: " execute eslint with --fix flag let g:...


9

As noted, the FAQ says: 4.5. Q. How can I pass additional arguments to a checker? A. In most cases a command line is constructed using an internal function named makeprgBuild(), which provides a number of options that allow you to customise every part of the command that gets run. You can set these options using global variables. The ...


8

You can indeed use an autocommand: augroup MyStuff autocmd! autocmd FileType qf setlocal wrap augroup END This will affect the quickfix window, too, but I presume that would be desirable. You can find a sort of oblique reference to this in the documentation by opening :help location-list and then searching for filetype. Even better, use Vim's after ...


7

To switch between two windows see :h window-move-cursor. Here you'll use Ctrl-wj and Ctrl-wk, since the windows are horizontally split. Now to use :lnext and :lprev more easily you could use a mapping as suggested by @muru. To do so add something like that to your .vimrc: nnoremap <c-n> :lnext<CR> This line will make Ctrl-n execute :lnext in ...


7

The solution given in Jepz's answer didn't completely work for me. eslint was correctly called with the --fix option. However, maybe it's because of internals that have changed, but it seems like checktime was called before the end of eslint --fix, so the file reloading didn't work properly, triggering a file has changed, are you sure you want to write to it?...


6

Yes, syntastic can filter out certain messages. Read :help 'syntastic_quiet_messages' for details. All you have to do is fill this dictionary in your vimrc with a regex like this: let g:syntastic_quiet_messages = { "regex": [ \ '\mpossible unwanted space at "{"', \ 'SOME OTHER SYNTASTIC MESSAGE', ... \ ] }


5

No, this unfortunately isn't possible. The signs column is separate, and always with a width of two cells. From :help signs: When signs are defined for a file, Vim will automatically add a column of two characters to display them in. When the last sign is unplaced the column disappears again. You could only configure Syntastic to not use signs at ...


5

From the syntastic docs: 'syntastic_mode_map' Default: { "mode": "active", "active_filetypes": [], "passive_filetypes": [] } Use this option to fine tune when automatic syntax checking is done (or not done). The option should be set to something like: let g:...


5

Using Ubuntu, I couldn't figure out what was calling python or to change the default environment for all instances of syntastic. That would have been desirable. Instead what I did was install flake8, pip3 install flake8 Then you can easily configure this to work by adding the following line to your ~/.vimrc let g:syntastic_python_checkers=['flake8'] ...


3

This is the default in NASM, try using the BITS directive by putting BITS 64; at the top of the .asm file.


3

Despite you can use autocmds to set the 'filetype', it is better to create a ~/.vim/filetype.vim, as mentioned in :help 43.2 and explained in Vim FAQ 26.8: A better alternative to the above approach is to create a filetype.vim file in the ~/.vim directory (or in one of the directories specified in the 'runtimepath' option) and add the following lines: ...


3

In my .vimrc, I have: let g:syntastic_cpp_checkers = ['gcc'] let g:syntastic_cpp_compiler = 'gcc' let g:syntastic_cpp_compiler_options = '-std=c++14' And, if you have YCM enabled: let g:ycm_show_diagnostics_ui = 0 And now it works!


2

Syntastic allows passing arguments directly to the checkers using the syntastic_<filetype>_<checker>_<option> variable name format. It supports global (g:) and buffer (b:) variants with the buffer having preference over the global one. filetype and checker are obvious so I won't get in detail. option is what interests you. It can be exe, ...


2

Also answered here I just created this for my :Man viewer. It tracks the current item in the 'locationlist' window when navigating: function! s:visibleLoc() return len(filter(getwininfo(), {i,v -> v.loclist})) endfunc function! s:followLine() let curLine = line(".") if (exists("b:lastLine") && b:lastLine == curLine) || 0 == s:...


1

From the docs (:help syntastic-error-signs): Signs are colored using the Error and Todo syntax highlight groups by default (see |group-name|). If you wish to customize the colors for the signs, you can use the following groups:     SyntasticErrorSign - For syntax errors, links to "error" by default     SyntasticWarningSign - For syntax warnings, links to "...


1

It seems you are at least partially aware of how this works but let's lay it out formally... When you define the sign you specify the highlighting group to be used when that sign is displayed. (Run :hi to see all of your currently defined groups.) For example, a sign that will have the same background color (and foreground color!) as one's 'colorcolumn' ...


1

The has() always checks for features compiled into Vim (e.g. mostly what you can see in the output of :version with either a + or - prepended). It won't work to test for loaded plugins. What would work, is checking if the script loading guards, that usually every well-defined plugin has. For syntastic this would be the variable g:loaded_syntastic_plugin, ...


1

That sets the mode of checking. From the syntastic docs: When set to "passive" syntastic only checks when the user calls :SyntasticCheck. So, instead of automatically running (say, when you save the file), it runs only when you explicitly tell it to. The entire autocommand, then, sets the checking mode to passive for TeX files. If the checker isn't ...


1

A full vimscript solution could be to put each tag on its own line with a substitution and then rely on the built-in formatter: :%s/></>\r</g Gives: <html> <body> <h1>header1</h1> <p> </p> <p> </p> <div> <p> </p> </div> </body> </html> And then gg=G gives: &...


1

You could use something like this: function! ToggleSyntastic() for i in range(1, winnr('$')) let bnum = winbufnr(i) if getbufvar(bnum, '&buftype') == 'quickfix' lclose return endif endfor SyntasticCheck endfunction nnoremap <F8> :call ToggleSyntastic()<CR> As Syntastic populates ...


1

After you toggle the value of g:ycm_show_diagnostics_ui, run :YcmRestartServer and then reload the file with :e.


1

In case anyone is still looking for information on this, there are a few ways to resolve this issue. You can: set the path to the file with a -P|--source-path= quiet the message with a disable directive Each of these can be done in a few places. I'll cover each in turn. In your .shellcheckrc file: .shellcheckrc: # tell shellcheck to look for include ...


1

But this is still stupid and annoying. Or maybe that's just me. I had not noticed there's separate but similar options for C and C++. let g:syntastic_cpp_check_header Does the trick.


1

You could disable syntax checking for a specific filetype by overriding the default checker and tell him to use none. let g:syntastic_filetype_checkers['python'] = ['python'] " will use python as checker let g:syntastic_filetype_checkers['python'] = [] " won't use any checker You could set this option to be empty for every filetype you don't want ...


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