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6

vimdiff as well as the other binaries are just symbolic links to the actual vim binary. This is done because when vim starts up it checks under which name it has been started and does perform some extras (like running diff mode for vimdiff, starting the gui for gvim, or just starting in read-only mode for view or starting in ex mode for ex). So in short the ...


3

There are special keys <k0> to <k9> and <kPlus>, <kMinus>, <kDivide>, <kMultiply>, <kEnter>, and <kPoint>, which can be mapped separately, e.g., inoremap <k0> Zero inoremap <k1> One ... I checked this with GVim running on Windows 7; the behavior on macOS might be different.


3

Got an answer on the vim_use Google group. It came down to priorities, and which vimrc is being used. For MacVim, there's a .gvimrc as well as a .vimrc file, and the .gvimrc file was overriding the .vimrc settings. Once I copied the .vimrc file to .gvimrc with the following changes in particular, I got the same view: set tabstop=4 softtabstop=0 expandtab ...


2

The reason that o works the way it does is that, with autoindent or smartindent set, it will insert whitespace in order to match the indentation of the previous line. When you move downwards in normal mode without entering insert mode, the line remains empty and no text is added, so the cursor moves to the start of the line. The simplest way to achieve ...


2

There are several GUIs for Neovim because it externalises the user interface elements, so any GUI can draw these in different ways. There's a list that tracks the status of these projects. My favourites are FVim and goneovim and both support remote sessions


2

That setting only sets the shell used by Terminal. You need to set your log-in shell with chsh -s /bin/bash to make Bash the default one on any other application. You can also try set shell=/bin/bash in your .vimrc


1

It looks like your version of NERDTree was corrupted. It really looks to me that for some reason the *.vim scripts that were under lib/nerdtree inside the NERDTree plug-in directory ended up being moved to a plugin/nerdtree directory. Not sure if you can explain why this might have happened? I see you're using Pathogen, which is OK, but it puts the burden ...


1

It appears that the solution was to upgrade NERDTree by running the following command: git clone https://github.com/preservim/nerdtree.git ~/.vim/bundle/nerdtree I also discovered why my helptags weren't working (a long term issue not asked about in the question), I had to run this: :helptags ~/.vim/bundle/nerdtree/doc/ Thank you to @filbranden for ...


1

I would suggest installing MacVim which already comes with many (all?) of these keybindings set as default. Within MacVim, I found I could use <D-key> in mappings, to capture Cmd-key presses. For example: # Undo and redo nnoremap <D-Z> u nnoremap <D-S-Z> <C-R> # Navigate back and forwards nnoremap <D-[> <C-O> nnoremap &...


1

The reason why command redirection through <(...) resolves to a unique name on Linux is due to the Linux kernel exposing these as virtual symlinks to such unique name. You can easily verify that, on Linux, with a command such as: $ ls -l <(echo hello) lr-x------ 1 filbranden filbranden 64 Mar 7 13:37 /proc/self/fd/63 -> 'pipe:[75220421]' One way ...


1

On OS X, the open command (according to man open) acts "as if you had double-clicked the file's icon": The open command opens a file (or a directory or URL), just as if you had double-clicked the file's icon. If no application name is specified, the default application as determined via LaunchServices is used to open the specified files. The man docs don'...


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