4

Another option is to install Homebrew on Linux as an alternate package manager and use it to install the latest vim with: brew install vim Homebrew Features: Can install software to your home directory and so does not require sudo The repositories are generally newest version Install software not packaged by your host distribution Install up-to-date ...


2

Installing Nerd fonts for my ubuntu 18.04 worked. As the devicons FAQ page said, it was designed for nerd fonts.


2

Checking the output of filter helped diagnose the problem, my vimrc also contained the following line: " If installed using Homebrew Plug '/usr/local/opt/fzf' which referred to a program (fzf) that wasn't installed but also couldn't be installed by vim-plug. Installing it properly fixed the problem.


2

In fact the "simpler version" on Ubuntu is also a Vim. Vim can be compiled with more or less features. The "simple" Vim is still available as vi.tiny (at least on Ubuntu 16.04). I would recommend to just use the full-featured Vim (called "Huge version"). It has things like syntax highlighting and a lot more. BTW: If you want to use Vim with graphical UI, ...


2

What I would do is the following: ESC :w to write (save) the file. Then :e number12.py. That will open a new buffer in the current window, if the file doesn't exist.


2

You have two options: Install vim-nox. From the package description (apt-cache show vim-nox), This package contains a version of vim compiled with support for scripting with Lua, Perl, Python 3, Ruby, and Tcl but no GUI. Install vim-athena. From the package description (apt-cache show vim-athena), This package contains a version of vim compiled with a ...


1

As noted by @Christian Brabbandt in the comment before, apparently, this is from YouCompleteMe auto-completion. As mentioned in YouCompleteMe, github about Diagnostic UI, This turns on YCM's diagnostic display features including like the gutter signs, text highlighting, diagnostic echo and auto location list population. To disable this, I put : let g:...


1

You can compile Vim from source to configure which interpreter it should use. The full instructions can be found on the YouCompleteMe wiki. It turns out the method described in the original post is correct: configuring the installation with the following options should have Vim link against Python 3.7 ./configure \ --enable-python3interp=yes \ ...


1

If $DISPLAY is (incorrectly) set in your SSH environment, then Vim may be timing out trying to connect to an X server that doesn't exist. It does this for functionality like copying to/from the X selections. You can verify this in a couple of ways. Check if vim -X removes the delay Use vim --startuptime to see details about what Vim does when starting up. ...


1

You mentioned that you are running on Ubuntu. This means that the executable called vi is the same one as vim, unless you've gone out of your way to install another vi-compatible editor and changed it to be the default, which is unlikely. The name Vim is an abbrevation of "VI iMproved". vi is an editor in its own right. Vim is based on a vi clone called ...


1

type -a vi will give you the full path(s) to the vi(m) executable(s) . Most likely the simpler version is vim.tiny or vim.basic. Then you can create an alias to whichever version of vi(m) you want.


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