45

You have three different options: Wait for the newest versions to be added to the distribution packages. Note that you might want to learn a new language or build a ship with your bare hands while you wait. If waiting several years is not good for you then you have the following two options: Use a PPA containing the latest version: Pros: Easy to do. ...


25

So, installing vim-enhanced and vim-X11 is enough, but is not at the same time. To enable the system funtcions like +clipboard, you moreover need to use the vimx executable rather than vim or vi (even though they are probably identical, the name changes the behaviour). One way how to do that permanently is by adding aliases in your .bashrc file: alias vi='...


23

The package description contains This package contains a version of vim compiled with a rather standard set of features. This package does not provide a GUI version of Vim. See the other vim-* packages if you need more (or less). I believe this was made, because using the clipboard would involve linking against X libraries, which means, you ...


15

If you look at the options used to build the various packages (in debian/rules), you'll see OPTFLAGS+=--with-features=huge ... NOINTERPFLAGS:=--disable-luainterp NOINTERPFLAGS+=--disable-mzschemeinterp NOINTERPFLAGS+=--disable-perlinterp ifeq ($(DEB_VENDOR),Ubuntu) NOINTERPFLAGS+=--enable-pythoninterp --with-python-config-dir=$(shell python-config --...


14

I think tuxproject.de is the way to go and I think, it will pick up Python dll, if they are in your path and are also 64bit. The easy way is to copy them to your .vim directory, to make sure vim will find them when trying to load them. There is another alternative (and I really hope this will become official). We are trying to build binary Vims as part of ...


12

You need to compile Vim yourself or get a prebuilt Vim package that was compiled with Python support. If you're on a Debian based system, the easiest way is to download the vim-gnome or vim-gtk package from apt (apt install vim-gtk for instance). Other distros might have a similar package with python support built in. If you'd prefer to compile Vim ...


11

The pi-rho/dev PPA now supports Vim 8, and like it always has, includes support for Python/Python3: $ vim --version | grep python +cryptv +linebreak +python/dyn +vreplace +cscope +lispindent +python3/dyn +wildignore $ apt-cache policy vim vim: Installed: 2:8.0.0134-1ubuntu1~ppa1~x Candidate: 2:8.0.0134-1ubuntu1~...


10

Yes. Vim-gnome does install gvim, but it also installs a much more feature-filled version of command line vim, including Perl, Python, Ruby, and TCL scripting, system-clipboard, newer patches, etc. So not only can you continue to use command line vim, you will get a better version of command line vim along with the GUI. As for SSH editing, I don't believe ...


9

It looks like I'm a bit late, but I'll leave this here for future visitors also struggling with this. $ sudo apt install vim-nox This is the Vim package in Debian Stretch that adds support for scripting languages. You should try to do it this way, as it is easier to update/remove. Edit: Consider switching to Neovim


8

From your question it appears that you have installed vim-tiny 8.0 that is a very minimal Vim runtime without plugins. You can confirm this using this: dpkg -l | grep vim You can have several Vim runtimes, but the version running when you do vim will be the version that you can see indicated here: update-alternatives --list vim You can check other ...


7

For configuration command you've specified gnome2 as your main GUI (--enable-gui=gnome2), are you sure it's the right one? Or maybe gnome2 is not enough to enable GUI, so try to add extra --enable-gui, --with-x parameters. You can also configure so your GUI would be detected automatically by --enable-gui=auto. Also make sure that you have all your ...


7

I was just looking this information up and I only found one x64 version not mentioned by Christian. Here's a summary of the interfaces each version supports today to give you an idea of how well they stay up to date: Nearly Official Vim 7.4.1832 and x64 Interfaces: ActivePerl 5.22, ActiveTcl 8.6, LuaBinaries 5.3, Python 2.7, Python 3.4, Racket 6.4, ...


6

can I still use it in the text mode I am familiar with? Yes, you can still use the terminal version of vim. How does the gui mode interact with a terminal-based user? If you SSH into a machine and run vim there, you won't be able to use the GUI unless you have some setup for remote desktop. Does that mean you start it with the command gvim instead ...


6

Thanks to x33a on the Arch forums, I was able to solve my problem. (https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?pid=1596987#p1596987) I changed the python 3 flag from --enable-python3interp=dyanmic to --enable-python3interp This resulted in only python 3 being available.


6

You are not supposed to do anything with the default runtime so where Vim was installed doesn't matter. Whatever customization you want to do, do it in $HOME.


6

you should use sudo apt-get install vim-nox instead, to get a "huge-version".


5

Indeed the version you get with apt-get install vim doesn't have all the features of a version compiled with --with-features=huge. For example you don't always have options like +python or +lua. A good alternative is to use apt-get install vim-nox which is much more complete.


5

I don't think you can enable the profile feature via ./configure; you either have to define FEAT_PROFILE or simply build a huge version of Vim, which then includes that feature. From src/feature.h: /* * +profile Profiling for functions and scripts. */ #if defined(FEAT_HUGE) \ && defined(FEAT_EVAL) \ && ((defined(...


5

You should install vim from source. That way, you have control over what is included. See the following for more info and a step by step walkthrough. It is relatively easy. https://github.com/Valloric/YouCompleteMe/wiki/Building-Vim-from-source https://github.com/vim/vim


4

$ sudo apt-get install vim-gtk (or vim-gnome if you are on Ubuntu) will get you the most complete Vim with the least effort. Official packages usually lag a bit so, if you really want the latest version, you will have to apply the latest patches and build it yourself. Be aware, though, that new patches come up every couple of days, so keeping up with ...


4

The problem was not in Vim's default Python interpreter. The real root of the problem is that the last version of jedi-vim (0.7.0) was released in 2013 and did not work well with Python 3. Since then Python 3 support in jedi-vim has been improved a lot. We (Arch users) asked jedi-vim to make a new release. 0.8.0 has been released and now it is in the Arch ...


4

It seems that chocolatey could be the solution to your problem. It is a package manager for Windows. (With the ambition of being "sort of apt-get for Windows") If you are ready to use it to install your softwares such as Vim it then provides a choco upgrade <pkg> command to update your package. Fortunately, Vim is a package included in the list and ...


4

vim doesn't need gnome or gtk to get +clipboard, but it does need x11. From my tests, the minimum amount of dependencies needed are the xorg header files and x11 dbus support. In Debian apt-get install x11-dev dbus-x11 will do the job. Then you can ./configure --with-features=huge and vioala, +clipboard


4

I unknowingly had installed on my system the set of packages "vim-plugins". Among these was "vim-jedi" which seems to be the one causing behavior I didn't want. I used the package manager to remove it. Thanks very much for the commenters who helped me diagnose this!


4

Solution 1 : Install VIM Editor(Install any one of them of vim variant) : vim-gtk3 :- This package contains a version of vim compiled with a GTK3 GUI and support for scripting with Lua, Perl, Python, Ruby, and Tcl. In order to install this package : sudo apt install vim-gtk3 vim-gtk :- This package contains a version of vim compiled with a GTK2 ...


4

I too struck this issue after updating from Jessie to Stretch. As noted in another answer, installing vim-nox should resolve this issue (as vim-nox in Stretch is compiled against python2). However, I figured that python3 is the way of the future. So I decided to fix it another way. If you need Python2 support, installing vim-nox is probably the best ...


3

Where is my vim installed? If you installed through apt the following sequence should get you to the Vim installation. From inside Vim, :echo $VIMRUNTIME /usr/share/vim/vim74 You could look in here and you would discover the Vim files, but if you wanted a more programmatic, portable approach, you could then use dpkg i.e. dpkg -S, -- search for file ...


3

Instructions can be found on the Neovim Wiki As of the posting of this answer, the site's current instructions are as follows: Ubuntu Neovim has been added to a Personal Package Archive which allows you to install it using apt-get on Ubuntu 12.04 and later. To be able to use add-apt-repository you may need to install software-properties-common: sudo apt-...


3

This is the expected result. There are no tests has('python/dyn') and has('python3/dyn'), only has('python') and has('python3').


3

I figured out the problem. libperl-dev package was not installed. Need to have it to have perl enabled in vim.


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