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Most “core” filetype features are covered by autocommands, so disabling them will have the effect that you want. But we only want to disable them when opening a particular file, so :noautocmd edit {file} I’ll update with more information on the autocommands and features when I get to my laptop.


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The most accurate and compliant way is to extend filetypes with after/ftplugin/{text,markdown}.vim. Your "no extension" files can probably be detected as "text" filetype as well (or create a completely new filetype if you like). Then the actual functionality should be shared by a common autoloaded script. But if you don't care then a ...


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You can use the value of &filetype to determine if you are in a buffer without a filetype or with one of the filetype you want to target. One example could be like this: function! DoStuff() if (exists('b:StuffDone') || index(['', 'text', 'markdown'], &ft) < 0) return endif let b:StuffDone = 1 echo "Doing stuff for&...


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'wildignore' is a list of file patterns which be ignored for completing (among other things as well) set wildignore+=*.class 'suffixes' is a list of file suffixes which will lower the priority of filename in completion set suffixes+= class For more help see: :h 'wildignore' :h 'suffixes'


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