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1

Using a timer that regularly read the file for what colour mode is in use I solved the question. Here is the script that reads and calls the changes: " Set colour scheme (and more) to light mode function! ColorModeLight() colorscheme onehalflight let g:color_mode_light=1 ... endfunction " Set colour scheme (and more) to dark mode ...


0

This was the color schemes defined in paper color theme. Just pasting this in the vimrc worked! let g:terminal_ansi_colors = [ \'#eeeeee', '#af0000', '#008700', '#5f8700', \'#0087af', '#878787', '#005f87', '#444444', \'#bcbcbc', '#d70000', '#d70087', '#8700af', \'#d75f00', '#d75f00', '#005faf', '#005f87' ]


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So "peachpuff" has just the white background in console. You can patch the source directly, or add this to your vimrc: augroup peachpuff | au! autocmd colorscheme peachpuff hi Normal ctermfg=0 ctermbg=223 augroup end Still not exactly the same as in GUI, but it's much closer now. P.S. Or you can "extend" an existing color scheme ...


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In the code of peachpuff colorscheme we can find such note: " Note: Only GUI colors differ from default, on terminal it's just `light'.


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I was able to set these elements to different colors by targeting these two highlight groups: EndOfBuffer NonText So in my case, I added the following to my .vimrc, mirroring the way the colors are established within the distilled colorscheme's files: hi clear EndOfBuffer hi clear NonText hi EndOfBuffer ctermbg=0 ctermfg=8 cterm=NONE guibg=NONE guifg=#...


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You could use :execute— execute printf('highlight Comment guifg=%s', yellow2)


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