7

Here is a bit more complete answer to address this annoyance: " Force to use underline for spell check results augroup SpellUnderline autocmd! autocmd ColorScheme * \ highlight SpellBad \ cterm=Underline \ ctermfg=NONE \ ctermbg=NONE \ term=Reverse \ gui=Undercurl \ guisp=Red autocmd ColorScheme * \ ...


5

As you can read from :h 'termguicolors': 'termguicolors' 'tgc' boolean (default off) global Enables 24-bit RGB color in the TUI. Uses "gui" :highlight attributes instead of "cterm" attributes. So your highlighting command can not work since it doesn't provide a guifg attribute. I think the following should do the trick: highlight ...


5

This is happening because Vim's HTML syntax will use style htmlHead to the text within the <head> block and it will link it to syntax group PreProc. (The PreProc group is meant for pre-processor directives, such as #include or #define in C/C++.) The slate colorscheme uses a white background (guibg=white) for the PreProc group, so it ends up styling ...


5

You're probably overlooking the additional attributes set in the cterm= field for those highlights. For instance, after I set ctermfg=black ctermbg=white for StatusLine, I get this when I query it: :hi StatusLine StatusLine xxx term=bold,reverse cterm=bold,reverse ctermfg=0 ctermbg=15 gui=bold,reverse You'll see the cterm=bold,...


4

The AfterColors plug-in (GitHub mirror) provides an after-directory auto-loading mechanism for color schemes. This can however be easily achieved in modern Vim by using the ColorScheme autocommand event (triggered after loading a color scheme and added in v7.0164) and <amatch> (which holds the new color scheme name and was added in v7.4.109). ...


3

Highlight in gui or true color terminal with :h termguicolors is not affect by :h cterm, cterm is used for 8, 16, 256 color terminal. This command should change gui LineNr: hi LineNr guifg=#ff0000 guibg=#000000 A quick look at the source, this colorscheme use only 16colors, it doesn't use ansi 16 colors, it works for gui, true color and 256color terminal. ...


3

Why the colorscheme is loaded twice This is slightly speculative, since your excellent and detailed question nevertheless still doesn't contain quite enough information about your setup to be certain, but I believe what is happening is this: When Vim starts up, one of the first things it does is load your $VIM/vimrc file, which loads your colorscheme, thus ...


3

The identifier was cppSTLnamespace. Thanks to @D.Ben Knoble for his plugin! The full command is hi cppSTLbamespace guifg=...


3

You have mistaken your terminal color scheme with the Vim color theme. To change the Vim color theme, you need to use :color command, followed by a valid color theme on your system, for example, color desert.


2

Extending Ingo Karkat's solution to terminal, hi DiffAdd ctermfg=NONE ctermbg=Green hi DiffChange ctermfg=NONE ctermbg=NONE hi DiffDelete ctermfg=LightBlue ctermbg=Red hi DiffText ctermfg=Yellow ctermbg=Red Below are the cterm-colors, if you want to add your preferred color instead of the ones I used. NR-16 ...


2

Consider using the synIDattr() function, which can take special attributes such as fg# and bg# to return RGB for attributes, when a GUI is running. "fg#" like "fg", but for the GUI and the GUI is running the name in "#RRGGBB" form "bg#" like "fg#" for "bg" "sp#" like "fg#" for "sp" The first argument to this function is a numeric {synID}, if ...


2

You can try this vimscript (add to your vimrc and call SetHLGreen() function) "" Get all highlights in a raw string fun! GetHLStr() redir => all_hl highlight redir END return all_hl endfun "" Set all known highlight groups to green fun! SetHLGreen() " get highlight groups without printing it in vim silent let hl_str = GetHLStr() ...


2

You have a few options to accomplish that. Actually changing the highlight rules after setting the colorscheme in your Vimrc is not a completely unreasonable approach, since the colorscheme is usually only reloaded if you set the background, so if you tend not to switch from "light" to "dark" or vice-versa, you might be fine... There are better approaches ...


2

You should also include: highlight ErrorMsg cterm=NONE The cterm attributes often interact with the color settings and can end up having Vim picking a "bright" shade of the color. The "koehler" theme ships with cterm=bold, which has this effect of using a bright color on many terminals, including iTerm2 (with default settings.) You can inspect your ...


2

Change your FileType autocommand to autocmd Filetype txt ++nested colorscheme NiceTheme to allow for nesting (by default, they do not nest). See :h autocmd-nested (and thanks to Matt for the tip).


2

SOLVED! The problem was the background variable, which was set to dark. set background=light solves the issue.


2

There are plenty. One is my own plugin, the code of which is straightforward: " Show the highlight groups under the cursor " Maintainer: David Ben Knoble <ben.knoble@gmail.com> " Last Change: 2018 May 11 if !has("syntax") || &compatible echohl ErrorMsg echomsg "vim-synstax requires the +syntax features" echohl None finish endif ...


2

In modern vim/neovim there is :h g:terminal_ansi_colors (vim) or 16 of g:terminal_color_0 .. g:terminal_color_15 (neovim). If you open gruvbox colorscheme you use, you will find those definitions there (most probably). Basically: your whatever terminal can have palette of base 16 colors defined (there are defaults for each type of terminal, but you can ...


2

In GVim, you can control the 16 ANSI colors used by your terminal with the g:terminal_ansi_colors variable. See :help g:terminal_ansi_colors: In GUI mode or with 'termguicolors', the 16 ANSI colors used by default in new terminal windows may be configured using the variable g:terminal_ansi_colors, which should be a list of 16 color names or ...


2

Final result It should be the same as it's 256color brother (without bold, underline, italic,...) Warning It's not easy, don't do it unless you really want to spend a lot of time in vc(virtual console). Setup terminal Switch to vc, change TERM: TERM=linux-16color Some important desription for linux-16color from ncurse terminfo, pls read it: # 16-color ...


2

Try the most recent updated of Goneovim, not the current release 0.4.6. It's not pure vim but a neovim gui, and it does not gain much attention. The indent guides feature of goneovim is native, and works much better than vim/neovim plugins.


2

There's :h g:indentLine_defaultGroup specially for this case. So it becomes simply let g:indentLine_defaultGroup = 'Comment' In principle, when you need to read in the color from an existing highlight group it's done like that: let color = synIDattr(synIDtrans(hlID('Comment')), 'fg') hlID() returns numerical ID; synIDtrans() follows links if any; ...


2

The highlight of the matching brace is ruled by the MatchParen group. You can customize it with the highlight command. Here's an example: highlight MatchParen guifg=Black guibg=Yellow


2

What you're seeing here is vim-markdown's support for highlighting embedded languages in fenced code blocks. In short, vim-markdown will recognize the python in ```python and it will use Python syntax highlighting for that code block. You can find the code that implements that here. It will create a new syntax highlighting group mkdSnippetPYTHON and have ...


2

I use a technique I picked up on reddit from /u/fob3sg: function! ColorCodeBlocks() abort " {{{1 setlocal signcolumn=no sign define codeblock linehl=codeBlockBackground augroup code_block_background autocmd! * <buffer> autocmd InsertLeave <buffer> call s:place_signs() autocmd BufEnter <buffer> call s:place_signs() ...


1

Is there some way I can get vim's colorscheme rendering more like gvim's? Yes! As long as your terminal supports "true color," you can ask Vim to use the gvim color settings of the colorscheme by enabling the 'termguicolors' setting: When on, uses highlight-guifg and highlight-guibg attributes in the terminal (thus using 24-bit color). Requires a ...


1

The jellybean color scheme tries to provide fallbacks for when fewer colors are available from the terminal. When less than 256 colors are available (to be more exact, less than 88), it will try to use "White over Grey" for the Pmenu highlight group. And when there are only 8 colors available (NR-8), then both "White" and "Grey" map to the same color 7. So ...


1

I tried it manually and the last line gave me this error: E254: Cannot allocate color s:splitcolor So the guifg value isn't set to anything. (The guibg value is set so that may explain why you noticed some change to the VertSplit appearance.) The problem is that this command doesn't evaluate the parameter values unlike, for example, the way :echo s:...


1

The current search color is set by the IncSearch highlight group. That's the color you'll see, while typing your search, on the current item (btw you can use <c-t> and <c-g> while typing to select previous / next item). But once you hit enter, vim should display only one color (from the search group), so I guess you are using a plugin to display ...


1

This looks as expected. Airline is a statusline plugin (read :help statusline). To set the editor's colorscheme, use :colorscheme [name].


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