New answers tagged

4

You're in luck: the after directory exists for exactly this reason. ~/.vim/after is usually the last entry of 'runtimepath', so that whatever a user puts there overrides anything before it. Since it can house a full runtime, you can put anything you would put in ~/.vim in ~/.vim/after! I use this commonly for ~/.vim/after/ftplugin to override previous ...


0

This works for Syntax autocommands, where the pattern (<match>) is just the filetype. It excludes any rst files: au Syntax *\(^rst\)\@<! …


Top 50 recent answers are included