4

I don't do tabs, so usually my

listchars=tab:▸ ,nbsp:␠,trail:·,precedes:«,extends:»

But it gets annoying with some sources. I'd like to subtract tab: from lcs in some filetypes. I've tried setlocal lcs-=tab (also tab:.*) to no avail.

Short of programatically re-computing lcs, what to do?

Edit: clearing tab: results in ^I's, so maybe I actually want to replace the sub-key, not remove it; nevertheless I'm still curious about the original question

11
  • 2
    If there's no easy answer (I'm not aware of one) you can use a one-liner for that programattic approach, e.g. something like let &listchars = join(filter(split(&listchars, ","), 'v:val !~ "tab:"'), ",")
    – B Layer
    Jul 16 at 11:58
  • 2
    In such cases (where I ran it interactively), I usually do :set lcs=<C-R>=&lcs<cr>. Now you have the current value in the commandline and I just use the cursor keys to remove what I do not want Jul 16 at 12:05
  • Yeah, I might have noted that my one-liner would be good for, say, a script but not so much in the interactive / manually typed case!
    – B Layer
    Jul 16 at 12:06
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    @ChristianBrabandt I use setl lcs=<tab> which lets me edit the current value, but, like I said, it gets annoying
    – usretc
    Jul 16 at 12:07
  • 1
    Are you asking me? I can assure you, I know a bit how Vim works. Really. Jul 16 at 13:32
4

The answer is at :help :set-=:

:se[t] {option}-={value}                *:set-=*
            Subtract the {value} from a number option, or remove
            the {value} from a string option, if it is there.
            If the {value} is not found in a string option, there
            is no error or warning.  When the option is a comma
            separated list, a comma is deleted, unless the option
            becomes empty.
            When the option is a list of flags, {value} must be
            exactly as they appear in the option.  Remove flags
            one by one to avoid problems.
            Also see |:set-args| above.

That is, you must use :set listchars-=tab:▸\ (I'm pretty sure the space needs escaped here).

1
  • Ah. So, too brittle to be useful in this case.
    – usretc
    Jul 16 at 14:45

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