3

I would like a piece of Vimscript which would

  • query the time of day
  • check whether it's later than, say, 6pm
  • set an option based on the result

Why? So that I get the dark solarized color scheme whenever I open my editor in the evening, the light one otherwise.

Can this be done?

9

On a Unix system you can add this to your vimrc:

if system('date +%H') > 18
    colorscheme night
else
    colorscheme day
endif

date +%H is a shell command which returns the hour in a 24 format (see man date).

system() allows you to get the result of a system command in vimscript. It is then easy to compare its result with the hour you want to trigger your setting.

EDIT as @LucHermitte pointed out in the comments, you should use strftime('%H') instead of system('date +%H') this is more portable.

Note that with this solution the code is only executed when you source your vimrc so if you start vim at 5:30 pm, your colorscheme will not change at 6:00 pm if you don't reload your vimrc.


EDIT - Automated and auto-update solution

I did this because I thought it was fun to do. The plugin linked in @ljden answer may be more robust, this is only a lightweight solution which may have some flaws. The fun thing about this solution is that it will change the colorscheme automatically without having to source your vimrc again: You can finally code for 24h straight without having to think about your colorscheme!

This solution will only work with vim8+ and the options +timers and +job.

The idea is pretty simple, you define:

  • g:dayTime the hour after which we should use daytime colorscheme
  • g:nightTime the hour after which we should use nighttime colorscheme.
  • g:colorschemeDay the colorscheme to use in daytime
  • g:colorschemeNight the colorscheme to use in nighttime

We create two helper functions:

  • DiffTime() which returns the number of milliseconds between two hours of the day.
  • IsDayTime() which returns a boolean saying if the current hour is between g:dayTime and g:nightTime

We also create the function ScheduleNewColorscheme which will do two things:

  • Set the colorscheme according to the hour of the day
  • Set a trigger to call itself when we pass nightTime or dayTime again.

Finally, we call the function immediately when the .vimrc is sourced to set the correct colorscheme:

" Define the hours which triggers the dayly colorscheme
let g:dayTime = [9, 30]
" Define the hours which triggers the nightly colorscheme
let g:nightTime = [18, 0]

" Define the colorschemes used by day and by night
let g:colorschemeDay = 'jellybeans'
let g:colorschemeNight = 'darkblue'

" Return the number of milliseconds beetwen the current hour and a target hour.
" Handles the case of a target hour the next day.
" Both hours should be lists composed of two elements: hours and minutes.
" Eg 11:20 pm = [23, 20]
"    09:00 am = [9, 0]
function! TimeDiff(current, target)
    let targetMilli   = (a:target[0] * 3600 + a:target[1] * 60) * 1000
    let currentMilli  = (a:current[0] * 3600 + a:current[1] * 60) * 1000

    if (a:target[0] > a:current[0] || (a:target[0] == a:current[0] && a:target[1] > a:current[1]))
        return targetMilli - currentMilli
    else
        return (24 * 3600 * 1000) + ( currentMilli - targetMilli )
    endif
endfunction

" Check if the current hour is between g:dayTime and g:nighTime
function! IsDayTime()
    let hCurrent = strftime('%H')
    let mCurrent = strftime('%M')

    if hCurrent == g:dayTime[0]
        return mCurrent >= g:dayTime[1]
    elseif hCurrent == g:nightTime[0]
        return mCurrent < g:nightTime[1]
    else
        return hCurrent > g:dayTime[0] && hCurrent < g:nightTime[0]
    endif
endfunction

" According to the current time and the nighttime, set the colorscheme and create
" a trigger for the job which will change the colorscheme
function! ScheduleNewColorscheme(timer)
    " Define colorscheme and next time depending on time of day
    if IsDayTime()
        let newColorscheme = g:colorschemeDay
        let targetDate = g:nightTime
    else
        let newColorscheme =g:colorschemeNight
        let targetDate = g:dayTime
    endif

    " Set new colorscheme
    echom 'setting colorscheme ' . newColorscheme . ' at ' . strftime('%H:%M')
    execute 'colorscheme ' . newColorscheme

    let currentDate = [strftime('%H'), strftime('%M')]
    let startDelay = TimeDiff(currentDate, targetDate)

    " Create the trigger for the next change
    call timer_start(startDelay, 'ScheduleNewColorscheme', {}) 
endfunction

" When sourcing your vimrc set the colorscheme immediately
call timer_start(0, 'ScheduleNewColorscheme', {}) 

EDIT I looked at the plugin linked in @ljden's answer and it includes another plugin in its source code (colorscheme-switcher) which requires a third plugin (vim-misc). So I thought why not make a lightweight plugin of my own? So here it is.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    No need to use system('date'). We have strftime('%H') that does exactly the same -- and that follows the C standard function conventions. Regarding triggers I guess we could check the current time when the plugin starts and decide automatically at which time the colorscheme should change. Given the duration, we can register a (vim 8) timer that will operate the change. – Luc Hermitte Sep 22 '17 at 9:08
  • @LucHermitte I didn't know about strftime() (because I never had to use time in vim I guess) about the trigger, I'm trying to put something up, I'll update my answer. – statox Sep 22 '17 at 9:19
3

No need to reinvent the wheel, had a quick google and here's a plugin that does exactly that! Even steps you through installing the plugin manager vim-plug (which is a great plugin manager) if you don't have it already.

| improve this answer | |
  • If you'd like to do it yourself have a read through the plugin and see if you can work out what it's doing. It is possible, so if you want to diy it have a go and once you're stuck then post more specific questions for help (or try get in contact with nightsense if you can – ljden Sep 22 '17 at 2:52
  • Wow, this seems to be exactly what I need. – oarfish Sep 22 '17 at 8:58

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