1

Here is my code:

autocmd BufWritePost *.c,*.cpp,*.h
  \   let dir=expand('<amatch>:p:h')
  \ | if filereadable(dir.'/Makefile') || filereadable(dir.'/makefile')
  \ |   Make > /dev/null
  \ | endif

I want vim to execute the command Make >> /dev/null if there is a Makefile or makefile in the same directory as the current file. However, the command executed is

:Dispatch make > /dev/null | endif

That is to say, | endif is treated as part of the command. How can I tell vim it's part of an if-statement?

The command Make and Dispatch come from vim-dispatch, if it's relevant.

1

If the :Make command you are using is this one, then your issue may come from the fact that it was not given the -bar attribute when it was defined. See :h :command-bar:

-bar        The command can be followed by a "|" and another command.
            A "|" inside the command argument is not allowed then.
            Also checks for a " to start a comment.

There are other solutions, but the simplest one may be to hide | endif from :Make by wrapping it inside a string, and executing the latter with :execute:

autocmd BufWritePost *.c,*.cpp,*.h
  \   let dir=expand('<amatch>:p:h')
  \ | if filereadable(dir.'/Makefile') || filereadable(dir.'/makefile')
  \ |   exe 'Make > /dev/null'
  \ | endif

For the complete list of commands which, like :Make, see the | as part of their argument, see :h :bar:

These commands see the '|' as their argument, and can therefore not be
followed by another Vim command:
    :argdo
    :autocmd
    :bufdo
    :cdo
    :cfdo
    :command
    :cscope
    :debug
    :folddoopen
    :folddoclosed
    :function
    :global
    :help
    :helpfind
    :lcscope
    :ldo
    :lfdo
    :make
    :normal
    :perl
    :perldo
    :promptfind
    :promptrepl
    :pyfile
    :python
    :registers
    :read !
    :scscope
    :sign
    :tcl
    :tcldo
    :tclfile
    :vglobal
    :windo
    :write !
    :[range]!
    a user defined command without the "-bar" argument |:command|

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